The Bones of You by Debbie Howells

Review: The Bones of You by Debbie Howells

I haven’t read many psychological thrillers, but The Bones of You caught my eye so I figured I’d give it a shot. I’m glad I did. In this novel an eighteen year old girl named Rosie goes missing, then several days later she’s found dead in the woods, stabbed and beaten. There are a couple suspects, Rosie’s secret boyfriend and her father, however there is not enough incriminating evidence to have them charged with the murder of Rosie.

Constant Fear by Daniel Palmer

Review: Constant Fear by Daniel Palmer

Jake and his teenage son Andy live alone in a trailer in a quiet Massachusetts town. His ex-wife Laura has been out of the picture for many, many years after Jake was in a drunk-driving incident which threw his baseball career out the window, as well as Andy’s diagnosis with diabetes. It was too much for her to handle so she walked out of his life, no traces of her to be found.

The two of them get along fine. Jake is a doomsday prepper and Andy is a computer geek. While Andy’s fine with his father’s doomsday preparations and he’ll help out sometimes as a sacrifice to keep his father happy, his patience with it is growing thin. As the days pass Andy wants less and less to do with the survival training his father forces upon him.

As it turns out, Andy is more than a computer geek. He’s a hacker. Him and a few of his friends at Pepperell Academy, where Jake works, are part of a secret computer club they call The Shire. They’ll hack into bank accounts of the wealthy and transfer a thousand or so dollars to those who could use it – and the people are so rich, they don’t even notice the money left their account.

Daughter of Deep Silence by Carrie Ryan

Review: Daughter of Deep Silence by Carrie Ryan

I’m the daughter of murdered parents. I’m the friend of a dead girl. I’m the lover of my enemy. And I will have my revenge. In the wake of the devastating destruction of the luxury yacht Persephone, just three souls remain to tell its story—and two of them are lying. Only Frances Mace knows the terrifying truth, and she’ll stop at nothing to avenge the murders of everyone she held dear. Even if it means taking down the boy she loves and possibly losing herself in the process. Sharp and incisive, Daughter of Deep Silence by bestselling author Carrie Ryan is a deliciously smart revenge thriller that examines perceptions of identity, love, and the lengths to which one girl is willing to go when she thinks she has nothing to lose.

Independence Day by Ben Coes - A Dewey Andreas Novel

Review: Independence Day by Ben Coes (A Dewey Andreas Novel)

Independence Day is the fifth novel in the action packed Dewey Andreas series by Ben Coes. Andreas is a Delta agent turned intelligence agent. Even though he’s been sidelined for the time being, Dewey Andreas defies orders and makes his way to Russia under the nose of the CIA, as there is a notorious Russian hacker named Cloud. Cloud has acquired a nuclear bomb and is attempting to move it overseas to the United States in time for an Independence Day bombing, all without raising suspicion. Will Cloud be able to successfully execute his master plan and cause “nine/twelve”, as it’s being dubbed?

A Killing Sky by Andy Straka (Frank Pavlicek Mysteries #2)

Review: A Killing Sky by Andy Straka (Frank Pavlicek Mysteries #2)

Brash Books claim to publish the best crime novels in existence, and I’m beginning to agree with them. Of the three novels I’ve read from them so far, two of them I’ve given a five star rating. A Killing Sky is five star material to me. The story is the second in a series that follows ex-cop now turned private investigator Frank Pavlicek. This time he’s hired by the daughter of a Virginia Congressman to find her missing twin sister, as she went missing after saying she was going to drive over to her boyfriend’s dorm and break up with him. With only a few leads to pursue, such as a seemingly unrelated hit-and-run that occurred 20 years ago, it’s up to Frank to find the missing twin before it’s too late.

Scarlett Undercover by Jennifer Latham

Review: Scarlett Undercover by Jennifer Latham

Scarlett is a fifteen-year-old undercover detective, which keeps herself out of trouble. Her and her older sister Reem are orphans, as their mother died of cancer and their father was murdered. This time, however it seems like trouble has found her. After Gemma, a nine year old girl approaches Scarlett and asks her to investigate whether a local suicide was orchestrated by someone else, she finds herself being followed by two people, and from there things only get worse. The further she digs, the more she finds: a mysterious cult, an ancient relic, and a family secret.

Review: The Awesome by Eva Darrows

In a world where the government is open about the existence of supernatural creatures, seventeen-year-old Maggie Cunningham and her mother hunt all sorts monsters together – except vampires. Maggie isn’t allowed to hunt them until she gets her journeyman’s license, which requires losing her virginity, as the blood of a virgin makes vampires seek them out. So what does Maggie do? She sets out on a journey to get the deed done…what can be so hard about finding a guy and doing it? As it turns out, a lot can be hard about it. (and no, “hard” is not meant to be an innuendo. But it’d totally fit the theme of the book)

Dry Bones by Craig Johnson - Longmire

Review: Dry Bones by Craig Johnson (Walt Longmire #11)

I thought I was going to really enjoy Longmire, but the book never pulled me in. I love the geographical setting (the midwest is an awesome place) and the writing flow was superb. The characters are all unique and I like the small touch of historical fiction the book encompasses, but even with all those great aspects in the book I never felt immersed in the story. It never really drew me in. I enjoyed it enough that I could easily finish the book, but I just never found it all that interesting. The book didn’t have as much action or excitement in the plot as I was hoping for, so it just really fell flat.